Archive for A View to a Kill

Roger Moore happy to admit he was too old for A View to a Kill

Posted in Daniel Craig, Roger Moore with tags on December 26, 2007 by Deborah Lipp

Nice interview here with Roger Moore.

First, he tells us something that many of us believed; that Daniel Craig is a very fine James Bond:

“I have seen Daniel Craig in a number of films. He is a thundering good actor. The movie (‘Casino Royale’) showed me that he is one hell of an athlete,”

In regard to AVTAK:

Moore, who was 58 when the movie came out, described the film as the least favorite of his Bond roles. “I was only about 400 years too old for the part!” he quipped.

Read the whole thing.

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Happy Birthday Dolph Lundgren

Posted in Birthdays with tags , , on November 3, 2007 by Deborah Lipp

Dolph Lundgren had a very brief appearance in A View to a Kill, primarily because he was in a relationship with Grace Jones at the time.

People sort of stare, stunned, at some of the excesses of the 1980s, and maybe find them hard to believe. So as a public service, I’ve dug up a picture of Dolph and Grace together:

Grace is the one on the left

Happy Birthday to Tanya Roberts

Posted in Birthdays, Bond Girls with tags , , , , on October 15, 2007 by Deborah Lipp

The actress best known for being an Angel, Sheena, and the worst Bond Girl in the history of Bond Girls (as voted consistently by the fans) turns 52 today.

Reminding us that, among the other atrocities committed by A View to a Kill, this is the movie in which Bond made love to a woman twenty-eight years his junior. Uck.

Sheena

Casino Royale is a HUGE hit with the fans

Posted in Best & Worst, Casino Royale, Ultimate JB Fan Book with tags , , , , , on September 19, 2007 by Deborah Lipp

I’m in the process of re-doing the statistical portions of the Ultimate James Bond Fan Book. I do several different sets of statistics.

First, and most labor-intensive, I tabulate as many “ranking” lists as I can find. That’s where fans rank all the Bond movies in order. I use this massive amount of data to develop a “master” ranking list. Such lists, though, are only produced by hardcore fans who are really obsessed with that kind of thing. It isn’t going to represent the general public.

So I also look to sources like Rotten Tomatoes and IMDb and general media surveys (which I’ve pulled out of magazines, news reports, and the like) to get stats on movie ratings (how many “stars” or “thumbs” or whatever), and on people’s #1 Bond film, and on people’s top five.

Top five is interesting, because it shows movies that are consistently very popular but may not hit #1 that often. You can also get a lot more fans to tell you their top five than their full list, so it’s more “general public” and less “geeks (like me).” I assign five points for a #1 position, four points for #2, and so on.

So last night I finished tabulating the Top Five stuff, and Casino Royale got twice as many points as the next nearest contender. That’s like…unbelievable.

Now, I fully believe that’ll moderate a bit over time; newest movies get the strongest reaction. I don’t think, for example, that Die Another Day will stay as low in the rankings as it currently is; it’s that low because people were angry, not because it’s objectively worse than A View to a Kill. But Casino Royale won’t moderate much, and it’s really damn impressive.

The history of Bond actors (in brief)

Posted in Daniel Craig, George Lazenby, James Bond, Pierce Brosnan, Roger Moore, Sean Connery, Timothy Dalton with tags , , , on August 28, 2007 by Deborah Lipp

When Eon first cast another actor as Bond, lots of folks said it couldn’t be done. If there had been an Internet back then, there would have been ConneryISBond.com. Even with the primitive (teehe) technology available in 1969, a lot of people managed to make their complaints heard. To this day, I run into people who have never seen anyone but Connery in the role, or have reluctantly viewed later movies and found them wanting—mostly, found them wanting a certain Scotsman.

But Lazenby’s casting, unsuccessful though it was, did an interesting thing: It freed Eon. They didn’t feel they had to cast ‘Connery light;’ audiences still came to see a Bond movie without The Man. So they felt confident in changing the game utterly, and casting Roger Moore; long on their list, and an actor absolutely nothing like Sean Connery.

But confidence is a funny thing. Once Moore proved a hit, Eon was reluctant to change. There is no doubt that Moore was way too old to play 007 in A View To a Kill, but I’d argue he was long in the tooth by Octopussy, even though that is a much better movie. Seven movies is probably just too many.

Letting go of Moore finally taught the Bond producers a lesson in letting go; a lesson that perhaps Pierce Brosnan believes they learned too well. Lots of fans (like me) believe that Brosnan had a fifth excellent Bond in him, but it was not to be.

What’s interesting here is the way that Eon was able to move from one actor to the next. Dalton made one successful and one less-than-stellar (financially) movie, and some of us stand by his portrayal. But from Dalton on, the producers have been able to look at each actor as truly a new era, a new Bond, a new interpretation, and allow the movies to shape the actor, and the actor to shape the movies.

Could Pierce Brosnan have made Casino Royale? I believe so. I believe he could have made an outstanding Casino Royale. But he couldn’t have made this Casino Royale; the one Daniel Craig made. It would have been a Brosnan movie, with whatever you feel is good or bad about that. CR is Craig’s movie through and through; I mean, yes, it’s Ian Fleming’s, it’s Martin Campbell’s, it’s Paul Haggis’s, but it’s really Daniel Craig’s. He’s been allowed to interpret the character, to be in his own place with 007, and that has made all the difference.